Fitness Instructors

DTP Offspring: Belly-N-Kicks™

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Eri­ka Boom is the founder and pres­i­dent of the Bel­ly-n-Kicks™ (B-n-K™) pro­gram, based in Mia­mi FL. She is an ACE cer­ti­fied per­son­al train­er as well as a DTP® cer­ti­fied pre/postnatal fit­ness train­er. Eri­ka – an accom­plished ath­lete – has been active­ly involved in the fit­ness indus­try help­ing hun­dreds of women for more than 10 years. Recent­ly, Eri­ka became a moth­er, gain­ing first-hand expe­ri­ence with her own B-n-K™ pro­gram!
Web­site: www.belly-n-kicks.com
Face­book: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Belly-n-Kicks/

What I most enjoy about my work is that we are empow­er­ing women in the most vul­ner­a­ble point in their life. I also love the fact that the health ben­e­fits of exer­cise are mul­ti­plied by two.

Our bod­ies are per­fect machines and we are strong human beings capa­ble of mul­ti­task­ing. I start­ed doing a bul­letin to nom­i­nate some “femmes extra­or­di­naire,” and I could fit in ALL of my clients!

I am in the process of writ­ing and review­ing the B-n-K™ Train­ing Man­u­al. I am also mov­ing in the direc­tion of fran­chis­ing the B-n-K™ Method­ol­o­gy.

Pregnancy Exercise Safety

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This post is adapt­ed from the 3/17/11 DTP Blog on Preg­nan­cy Exer­cise Safe­ty. For more evi­dence-based infor­ma­tion on Pre/postnatal Health & Fit­ness, check out the DTP Blog. The Blog includes infor­ma­tion start­ing pri­or to con­cep­tion and con­tin­u­ing through post­par­tum and mom-baby fit­ness.

There are three sec­tions to this post: 1) moms-to-be, 2) preg­nan­cy fit­ness teach­ers and per­son­al train­ers and 3) some spe­cif­ic con­traindi­cat­ed and adapt­ed exer­cis­es. All infor­ma­tion pre­sent­ed is based on peer-review research and evi­dence col­lect­ed over a 30 year peri­od of work­ing with this pop­u­la­tion. More infor­ma­tion on safe­ty can be found on this site on the page Ben­e­fits, Safe­ty & Guide­lines.

1) Safety & Exercise Guidelines for Moms-To-Be

First and fore­most, be safe. Trust your body. Make sure your teacher or train­er is cer­ti­fied by an estab­lished orga­ni­za­tion that spe­cial­izes in pre/postnatal exer­cise, has worked under mas­ter teach­ers dur­ing her prepa­ra­tion, and can answer or get answers to your ques­tions.

These are the safe­ty prin­ci­ples that we sug­gest to our par­tic­i­pants:

  • get prop­er screen­ing from your health care provider
  • pro­tect your­self
  • do not over­reach your abil­i­ties
  • you are respon­si­ble for your body (and its con­tents)

Squat­ting is an exam­ple of a stan­dard preg­nan­cy exer­cise used for child­birth prepa­ra­tion that must be adapt­ed by each indi­vid­ual based on body pro­por­tions, flex­i­bil­i­ty, strength and com­fort.

Don’t assume that because your teacher and some par­tic­i­pants can do a cer­tain move­ment or posi­tion that you should be able to do it just like they do. If your teacher is well trained, she will be able to help you select vari­a­tions that are appro­pri­ate for your body.

When you are exer­cis­ing, make sure you are get­ting the most from your activ­i­ty. Keep these find­ings in mind when choos­ing your work­out rou­tine:

  • Aer­o­bics and strength train­ing pro­vide the great­est health ben­e­fits, reduce the risk for some inter­ven­tions in labor, help short­en labor, and reduce recov­ery time
  • Cen­ter­ing helps to pre­vent injury; relax­ation and deep breath­ing reduce stress; and mild stretch­ing can relieve some dis­com­forts
  • Avoid fatigue and over-train­ing; do reg­u­lar exer­cise 3 — 5 times a week
  • Eat small meals many times a day (200–300 calo­ries every 2–3 hours
  • Drink at least 8 cups of water every day
  • Avoid hot, humid places
  • Wear good shoes dur­ing aer­o­bic activ­i­ties
  • BE CAREFUL! LISTEN TO YOUR BODY!

If you expe­ri­ence any of the fol­low­ing symp­toms, stop exer­cis­ing and call your health care provider:

  • Sud­den pelvic or vagi­nal pain
  • Exces­sive fatigue
  • Dizzi­ness or short­ness of breath
  • Leak­ing flu­id or bleed­ing from the vagi­na
  • Reg­u­lar con­trac­tions, 4 or more per hour
  • Increased heart­beat while rest­ing
  • Sud­den abnor­mal decrease in fetal move­ment (note: it is com­plete­ly nor­mal for baby’s move­ments to decrease slight­ly dur­ing exer­cise)

2) Safety & Exercise Guidelines for Teachers & Trainers

A prin­ci­ple of prac­tice that increas­es in impor­tance for fit­ness pro­fes­sion­als work­ing with preg­nant women is hav­ing the knowl­edge and skills to artic­u­late the ratio­nale and safe­ty guide­lines for every move­ment she asks clients to per­form.

This goal requires adher­ence to safe­ty as the num­ber one pri­or­i­ty. Here is how we delin­eate safe­ty and the pro­ce­dures we require of our instruc­tors for achiev­ing safe­ty in prac­tice:

First priority: safety [First, do no harm]
  • some­times med­ical con­di­tions pre­clude exer­cise
  • find an appro­pri­ate start­ing point for each indi­vid­ual
  • indi­vid­ual tol­er­ances affect mod­i­fi­ca­tion
  • gen­er­al safe­ty guide­lines are phys­i­cal
  • preg­nant women also need psy­cho­log­i­cal safe­ty
Mind-Body Safety Procedures
  • Cen­ter­ing enhances move­ment effi­cien­cy and safe­ty.
  • Always begin with cen­ter­ing.
Strength Training Cautions
  • avoid Val­sal­va maneu­ver
  • avoid free weights after mid preg­nan­cy (open chain; con­trol issue)
  • avoid supine after 1st trimester
  • avoid semi-recum­bent 3rd trimester
  • keep in mind the com­mon joint dis­place­ments, and nerve and blood ves­sel entrap­ment when design­ing spe­cif­ic exer­cis­es
Aerobics or Cardiovascular Conditioning Procedures
  • Mon­i­tor for safe­ty
  • Instruc­tion­al style needs to be appro­pri­ate.
  • Walk­ing steps with nat­ur­al ges­tures can be done through­out preg­nan­cy
  • Vig­or­ous steps with large ges­tures are more intense, appro­pri­ate as fit­ness increas­es
  • The abil­i­ty to cre­ate move­ment that will be safe and work for var­i­ous lev­els of fit­ness and at dif­fer­ent points in preg­nan­cy is one of the most crit­i­cal skills for preg­nan­cy fit­ness instruc­tors.
Venue Safety
  • Set­ting should pro­vide phys­i­cal and emo­tion­al safe­ty
    Equip­ment must be well-main­tained

3) Contraindicated and adapted exercises

Exer­cis­es for which case stud­ies and research have shown that there are seri­ous med­ical issues include the “down dog” posi­tion, rest­ing on the back after the 4th month, and abdom­i­nal crunch­es and oblique exer­cis­es. Here is more infor­ma­tion and adap­ta­tion sug­ges­tions:

Con­traindi­cat­ed: “Down Dog” requires that the pelvic floor and vagi­nal area are quite stretched, bring­ing porous blood ves­sels at the sur­face of the vagi­na close to air. There are records of air enter­ing the vagi­nal blood ves­sels in this posi­tion and mov­ing to the heart as a fatal air embolism.

Adap­ta­tion: Use the child’s pose, with the seat down rest­ing on the heels and the elbows on the ground, hands one on top of the oth­er, and fore­head rest­ing on the hands. Keep the heart above the pelvis.

_________

Con­traindi­cat­ed: Rest­ing on the back dur­ing relax­ation.

Adap­ta­tion: Rest in the side-lying posi­tion. About 75% pre­fer the left side, 25% pre­fer the right side.

_________

Con­traindi­cat­ed: Abdom­i­nal crunch­es and oblique exer­cis­es can con­tribute to dias­ta­sis rec­ti in some women. The trans­verse abdom­i­nal mus­cle is not always able to main­tain ver­ti­cal integri­ty at the lin­ea alba, and thus there is tear­ing and/or plas­tic­i­ty of that cen­tral con­nec­tive tis­sue.

Adap­ta­tion: Splint­ing with curl-downs, see posi­tions below. By press­ing the sides of the abdomen toward the cen­ter, women can con­tin­ue to strength­en the trans­verse abdom­i­nals with­out the shear­ing forces that place lat­er­al pres­sure on the lin­ea alba.

Curl-downs are gen­er­al­ly the safest and most effec­tive abdom­i­nal stren­then­ing exer­cise.

Splint by cross­ing arms and pulling toward cen­ter (L)

Or, splint by plac­ing hands at sides and press­ing toward cen­ter ®

Active Pregnancy — the rationale

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Moving into Motherhood

It’s time to hit the main theme again:  Aer­o­bi­cal­ly fit women are at reduced risk for things that go wrong in preg­nan­cy, improve their tol­er­ance for labor and birth, and recov­er more rapid­ly in the post­par­tum peri­od.

Mov­ing into Moth­er­hood

The arrival of the hol­i­days pro­vides a good rea­son to bring this up, yet again! Preg­nan­cy is a gate­way time in women’s lives…we become more aware of our bod­ies, our sen­sa­tions, our feel­ings, our needs, and how ver­sa­tile and amaz­ing our bod­ies are. We can make peo­ple with our bod­ies! Dur­ing preg­nan­cy, we often take precautions…we eat more care­ful­ly, avoid tox­ins, try to avoid stress. When the hol­i­days arrive, we see indul­gent behav­ior in a dif­fer­ent light.

Yet, even with all this focus on behav­ior, we some­times miss the biggest aid to a healthy preg­nan­cy:  phys­i­cal fit­ness. Research clear­ly demon­strates that fit women do bet­ter, are health­i­er and hap­pi­er. More and more in the U.S. we see dis­or­ders of nor­mal organ func­tion that accom­pa­ny seden­tary preg­nan­cy.

Let’s look at this a lit­tle clos­er (yes, I am going to repeat myself some more, but it is an impor­tant con­cept to spread). We live in a body mod­el that rewards an active lifestyle.

Being sedentary causes things to go wrong

Not mov­ing cre­ates bio­chem­i­cal imbal­ances because the car­dio­vas­cu­lar sys­tem atro­phies and mol­e­cules cre­at­ed in the brain or brought in through the diges­tion may not get where they need to go for a healthy metab­o­lism.

Your car­dio­vas­cu­la­ture is the high­way that brings usable sub­stances to the place they are used. You have to help it grow and devel­op, use it to pump things around and give it a chance to be healthy. Aer­o­bic fit­ness does all these things.

Advice for young women of childbearing age

If you are think­ing of preg­nan­cy, have recent­ly become preg­nant, or work with women of child­bear­ing age, we encour­age you to open avenues of activ­i­ty for your­self or oth­ers in this pop­u­la­tion. You can learn more from our blog dancingthrupregnancy.wordpress.com. You can seek out local pre/postnatal fit­ness experts on this site. Yoga is nice…we use some of it in our work, along oth­er spe­cif­ic exer­cis­es for which there is a direct health ben­e­fit. But, we also see yoga con­verts who come into our pro­gram in mid preg­nan­cy unable to breathe after walk­ing up a flight of stairs. How will they do in labor? Not as well as those who have been doing aer­o­bic dance or an ellip­ti­cal machine 2 or 3 times a week.

The AHA/ACSM guide­lines for the amount of aer­o­bic exer­cise need­ed to improve car­dio­vas­cu­lar sta­tus hold true for preg­nant women just as they do for the rest of the pop­u­la­tion – a min­i­mum of 150 min­utes of mod­er­ate, or 75 min­utes of vig­or­ous, or a com­bi­na­tion of these lev­els of inten­si­ty, per week. If you are not get­ting this lev­el of activ­i­ty, you are putting your health – and that of your off­spring – at risk.

Fitness Starts Early!

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Preg­nan­cy fit­ness is not only impor­tant for moms, but for the fetus as well. Evi­dence is clear that aer­o­bic fit­ness improves brain, heart, immune and meta­bol­ic function…at all ages, includ­ing in utero. If con­tin­ued ear­ly in life, healthy phys­i­cal adap­ta­tions that occur in the uterus become rein­forced behav­ior, prepar­ing a good foun­da­tion for a healthy lifestyle. Babies are acute observers of move­ment and activ­i­ty, and learn from each oth­er. A key com­po­nent of a good mom-baby pro­gram is the inter­ac­tion of the babies them­selves. A good teacher will facil­i­tate healthy activ­i­ty among our small­est class mem­bers!

There is grow­ing evi­dence that at all ages, aer­o­bic fit­ness pro­duces the great­est num­ber of ben­e­fits. Recent­ly, researchers deter­mined that aer­o­bic fit­ness in 9 and 10 year olds pro­duced ben­e­fits in the devel­op­ment of two impor­tant brain regions — the basal gan­glia and the hip­pocam­pus — that are sig­nif­i­cant fac­tors in prob­lem-solv­ing intel­li­gence. This is just one of the lat­est reports that tells us the capac­i­ty to absorb and use oxy­gen (which improves with aer­o­bic fit­ness) is a key to health, qual­i­ty and length of life…beginning in the womb!

Pregnancy Pathway, Pregnancy — Behavior: Avoiding Risks

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Some­times it seems like preg­nan­cy is a time of restric­tions. Avoid­ing risks can be one thing that makes it seem that way. But, bear with us here in an inter­est­ing trip through dan­ger and find­ing you find ways of enhanc­ing your preg­nan­cy!

Risk Fac­tor #1:

Lack of pre­na­tal care. More than any­thing else, be sure you have care. Hav­ing some­one mon­i­tor your health and that of your baby dur­ing preg­nan­cy is vital to a good out­come.

Risk Fac­tor #2:

Not exer­cis­ing. Seden­tary behav­ior increas­es the risk for meta­bol­ic, car­dio­vas­cu­lar and immune dis­or­ders.

I know, I know, you don’t have time to exer­cise. Well, pay now or pay lat­er, as they say. Make time to go to a class (make sure it includes 20 -30 min­utes of aer­o­bics) a cou­ple times a week. A class will also pro­vide social sup­port, anoth­er fac­tor that enhances your preg­nan­cy. Take a walk at lunch time. Prac­tice relax­ation tech­niques.

Risk Fac­tor #3:

Breath­ing dan­ger­ous fumes. Yes, this includes smok­ing and sec­ond-hand smoke. But, it also means avoid­ing envi­ron­ments where there is a lot smog (near high­ways), liv­ing with mold or dust, and fan­cy cleansers that may have dan­ger­ous chem­i­cals in them. Stick with vine­gar, ammo­nia or bleach as cleansers.

Smog can endanger your fetus!

Smog can endan­ger your fetus!

We are learn­ing that com­bus­tion exhaust from cars and trucks can neg­a­tive­ly affect birth weight and pre­ma­tu­ri­ty. If you live or work near a high­way or in an area where smog is preva­lent, what are your options? Can you trans­fer or move? Can you wear a mask? Talk to your care provider and fig­ure out the best pro­tec­tion for you and your fetus.

Risk Fac­tor #4:

Poor Nutri­tion. Yup, just go back one entry and find out how food affects preg­nan­cy. If you don’t eat enough pro­tein and drink enough water, you don’t make suf­fi­cient blood vol­ume to nour­ish your pla­cen­ta and thus your fetus.

Read labels!

Read labels!

Eat whole foods and learn to read labels when you buy processed foods. What is a “processed” food? Any­thing with more than one ingre­di­ent!

Some pro­cess­ing (ex: home­made soup) takes lit­tle nutri­tion away, but some pro­cess­ing (ex: pota­to chips) takes every­thing good away and replaces it with unsafe sub­stances. Look for low sodi­um, low sug­ar, high vit­a­min and min­er­al con­tent items with no sat­u­rat­ed or trans fats.

Read the ingre­di­ents; if you don’t know what the words mean, maybe you want to pass it up.

Risk Fac­tor #5:

Alco­hol and Drugs. Com­mon items can be as dan­ger­ous as street drugs, which

There is plenty of time in life for a glass of wine...later.

There is plen­ty of time in life for a glass of wine…later.

No. No. No. Only meds from your prenatal care provider are okay.

No. No. No. Only meds from your pre­na­tal care provider are okay.

Caffeine? Only one cup & only if you must.

Caf­feine? Only one cup & only if you must.

can severe­ly com­pro­mise you baby’s future. If you have a drug or alco­hol habit, get help.

Risk Fac­tor #6:

Genet­ics. You can have genet­ic pre­dis­po­si­tions for many preg­nan­cy issues. How­ev­er, that does not nec­es­sar­i­ly mean you will devel­op a giv­en dis­or­der. For exam­ple, nutri­tion and exer­cise great­ly reduce the risk and sever­i­ty of meta­bol­ic issues. Some genet­ic issues are unavoid­able how­ev­er, and your care provider will alert you to these, if they are rel­e­vant.

Risk Fac­tor #7:

Social issues — iso­la­tion, lack of sup­port, abuse, pover­ty. All of these fac­tors can have neg­a­tive effects.

If iso­la­tion is a sim­ple mat­ter of need­ing to meet oth­er moms-to-be, join an exer­cise pro­gram. That way, you get both sup­port and exer­cise; just be sure it includes aer­o­bics, along with cen­ter­ing, relax­ation and appro­pri­ate strength.

If your sit­u­a­tion is more dire, seek the help of a care provider or social work­er at your local hos­pi­tal or clin­ic. Safe­ty and sup­port are crit­i­cal for you at this time. Get the help you need. There are peo­ple who care. And, if you know of some­one who needs help, help them.

If you have oth­er risk fac­tors to offer, please post them in the com­ments. Thanks!

What’s next?  BIRTH!!